5th International Veterinary Social Work Summit

Knoxville, TN, 4th to 6th October, 2018

When

4th to 6th October, 2018 08:00 am - 09:00 pm

Website: 5th International Veterinary Social Work Summit

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Where

University of Tennessee College of Veterinary Medicine
2431 Joe Johnson Drive
Knoxville, TN
37996-4543
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Thursday, 4th October 2018

Time Hollingsworth Auditorium Plant Biotech 156 157 Ellington Plant Sciences 125 Ellington Plant Sciences 128
8:00 am Registration
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Registration

By:
VSW Team
October 4, 2018, 8:00 am to 12:00 pm
Hall: Hollingsworth Auditorium Track: Registration
Breakfast    
8:15 am    
8:30 am    
8:45 am    
9:00 am Compassion Fatigue: From Awareness to Action
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Compassion Fatigue: From Awareness to Action

Compassion fatigue can affect anyone in the role of healer, helper, or rescuer. As Hilfiker describes it: “All of us who attempt to heal the wounds of others will ourselves be wounded; it is, after all, inherent in the relationship.” This workshop is for anyone who works in the animal health and welfare industries (e.g. hospitals, rescues, assistance teams, humane societies, shelters, and animal control) and offers the opportunity to participate in an interactive discovery session inviting your awareness and experiences to learn about compassion fatigue. As our understanding of it continues to evolve, the session will also include the latest research findings. Following the session, there will be rotating round-table discussions brainstorming strategies that may be helpful to manage compassion fatigue, from the individual to the organizational level, which will then be shared with the larger group for mutual benefit. The beauty of this workshop lies in diversity, with people from various disciplines sharing their perspectives to together generate the most promising strategies.

By:
Debbie Stoewen DVM MSW RSW PhD
October 4, 2018, 9:00 am to 11:45 am
Hall: Plant Biotech 156 157 Track: Compassion Fatigue and Conflict Management
   
9:15 am    
9:30 am    
9:45 am    
10:00 am    
10:15 am    
10:30 am    
10:45 am    
11:00 am    
11:15 am    
11:30 am    
11:45 am      
12:00 pm Welcome and Get to Know You
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Welcome and Get to Know You

By:
Elizabeth Strand, Dean Thompson, Dean Dupper
October 4, 2018, 12:00 pm to 2:00 pm
Hall: Hollingsworth Auditorium Track: Welcome and get to know you
     
12:15 pm      
12:30 pm      
12:45 pm      
1:00 pm      
1:15 pm      
1:30 pm      
1:45 pm      
2:00 pm Break Break Break Break
2:15 pm
2:30 pm Veterinary Medicine as an Entry to Human Healthcare
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Veterinary Medicine as an Entry to Human Healthcare

With the cost of veterinary medical care on the rise, it is no secret that pet owners in poverty are having an increasingly hard time accessing services for their animals. Though there are many programs in existence that work to provide some level of care, frequently these take the form of high-volume spay/neuter or “vaccine day” type services. While this approach serves a very important public healthcare need for companion animals, it is not a viable option for ongoing management of disease. Furthermore, programs that are looking to provide more ongoing disease management for patients living with families in poverty find a few unique questions and challenges when compared to traditional veterinary practice. And yet, this sort of interaction and ongoing relationship can provide some exciting options for furthering access to human healthcare and services. This talk will look at three case examples of WisCARES, an outreach program at the University of Wisconsin School of Veterinary Medicine and School of Social Work, on how poverty affects the case management of a veterinary patient and the relationship the owner has with the veterinary healthcare provider.

Case one looks at intervention and management of a diabetic patient belonging to a homeless pet owner, and what ancillary education and support is necessary to ensure that treatment plans have the best chance of success - from the types of diagnostics to client education to long-term access to medication and management.

Case two looks at a situation in which chronic disease management of a patient is so intimately intertwined with the owner’s living situation that a true collaboration is needed for not only the goal of care for the patient, who is also the client’s emotional support animal, but also for support of the owner through that process. We also look at how the the relationship with a veterinarian puts us in a position to have a profound impact on a pet owner’s situation and look at what responsibilities veterinarians who work with these populations may have.

Case three looks at a situation where the act of veterinary medical care delivery has a direct impact on the owner’s ability to access his own healthcare services and how veterinary practitioners can be an instrumental partner for human healthcare and social work providers to help increase the human’s access to support services.

By:
Elizabeth Alvarez, DVM, DABVP (Canine and Feline Practice) , Ruthanne Chun, William Giles
October 4, 2018, 2:30 pm to 4:00 pm
Hall: Plant Biotech 156 157 Track: Animals and Poverty Type: 90 Minute Workshop
It's the Journey: Animal Assisted Play Therapy(TM) with Children Healing from Trauma and Homelessness
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It's the Journey: Animal Assisted Play Therapy(TM) with Children Healing from Trauma and Homelessness

Over 2.5 million children under age eighteen are considered to be part of chronically homeless families in the United States (Bassuk, DeCandia, Beach & Berman, 2010). Child homelessness correlates with a wide range of challenges beyond a lack of stable housing; these include poor school performance, juvenile justice involvement, and higher rates of physical and mental health challenges (Brumley, Fantuzzo, Perlman, & Zager, 2010; Uretsky & Stone, 2016). Moreover, child homelessness is highly correlated with experiences of interpersonal violence and trauma, while engagement in trauma therapy tends to be low among this population (Herbers, Cutuli, Monn, Naryan and Masten, 2014; Thompson, McManus, & Voss, 2006). The challenges facing this population are significant, but a recent pilot study suggests that animal assisted therapy presents a novel approach to engaging homeless children in mental health treatment.

In this workshop, the presenter will share a pilot study about a group of homeless children who worked with a clinician certified in VanFleet and Faa-Thompson’s (2017) Animal Assisted Play TherapyTM (AAPT) model. Through the lens of the case study of Timmy (pseudonym), an 11-year-old who participated in the study, participants will follow the trajectory that successful implementation of AAPT can take. Timmy entered therapy with a history of abuse, and engaged in externalizing behaviors including arson. Through his treatment with a therapy dog and a clinician versed in treating childhood trauma, Timmy was able to identify coping skills to manage his symptoms and ultimately process his traumatic experiences. Six months after leaving the shelter, his family was able to adopt a dog; Timmy’s mother credited his relationship with the family dog as the driving factor behind Timmy’s behavioral and academic success.

The presenter will share the implications of Timmy’s case, and the overall pilot study. These include a facilitated group discussion of the challenges and rewards of implementing AAPT in a homeless shelter setting. The workshop will encourage audience participation, as the presenter will challenge participants to consider their own professional training (as a social worker, veterinarian, etc.) in a discussion of the ethical implications of this case – both for Timmy and the therapy dog.

References
Bassuk, E.L., DeCandia, C.J., Beach, C.A., & Berman, F. (2014, Nov). America’s youngest outcasts: A report card on child homelessness. Retrieved from www.homelesschildrenamerica.org

Brumley, B., Fantuzzo, J., Perlman, S., & Zager, M. (2015). The unique relations between early homelessness and educational well-being: An empirical test of the Contiuum of Risk hypothesis. Child and Youth Services Review, 48, 31-37.

Herbers, J., Cutuli, J., Monn, A., Narayan, A., & Masten, A. (2014). Trauma, adversity, and parent-child relationships among young children experiencing homelessness. Journal of Abnormal Clinical Psychology, 42, 1167-1174.

Uretsky, M., & Stone, S. (2016). Factors associated with high school exit exam outcomes among homeless high school students. Children and Schools, 38(2), 91-98.

VanFleet, R., & Faa-Thompson, T. (2017). Animal assisted play therapy. Professional Resource Press; Sarasota, FL.

By:
Katharine Wenocur, DSW, LCSW, RPT, CAAPT
October 4, 2018, 2:30 pm to 4:00 pm
Hall: Ellington Plant Sciences 125 Track: Animal Assisted Interventions Type: 90 Minute Workshop
Compassion Fatigue: What it Is, What it Isn’t, and What Can Be Done
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Compassion Fatigue: What it Is, What it Isn’t, and What Can Be Done

Are you running low and running out – of compassion? Feeling exhausted and disillusioned? Feeling like you’re on a downhill trend? Whether you’re concerned about yourself or a colleague, this session is for you. In fact, it’s for everyone. Compassion fatigue can affect anyone in the role of healer, helper, or rescuer. As Hilfiker (1985) describes it: “All of us who attempt to heal the wounds of others will ourselves be wounded; it is, after all, inherent in the relationship.”

Many people think compassion fatigue is the consequence of being exposed to the pain and suffering of others, but it is so much more. For a number of reasons, those within the veterinary profession are especially vulnerable. As such, it is recognized as “the greatest threat to personal, professional and financial success among those who truly provide compassionate care.”

Compassion fatigue affects physical and mental health, professional competence and success, and vocational direction and development. Although the symptoms may be mild and considered the result of a stressful day, they can also be severe, additive, and potentially devastating, involving a cascade of adverse physiological, psychological, and interpersonal consequences. There are, however, a number of proactive strategies that can be employed to manage the consequences. Find out what compassion fatigue is, what it isn’t, and what you can do to sustain the heart of who you are!

Based on a textbook chapter:
Stoewen D. Compassion Fatigue. In: Tait J, Ausman B, eds. The First Bite: A Comprehensive Guide to Establishing and Growing Your Career in Veterinary Medicine. Guelph: Pandora Press, 2006.

By:
Debbie Stoewen DVM MSW RSW PhD
October 4, 2018, 2:30 pm to 4:00 pm
Hall: Ellington Plant Sciences 128 Track: Compassion Fatigue and Conflict Management Type: 90 Minute Workshop
2:45 pm
3:00 pm
3:15 pm
3:30 pm
3:45 pm
4:00 pm Break Break Break Break
4:15 pm
4:30 pm Stable Pathways: The Experience of Equine-Assisted Psychotherapy for Women on Probation
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Stable Pathways: The Experience of Equine-Assisted Psychotherapy for Women on Probation

This ongoing, qualitative research project was designed to explore the experiences of adult women on probation who participated in a trauma-informed, post-release program that included equine-assisted psychotherapy (EAP).

The prevalence of poor mental health exacerbated by past trauma among females in the criminal justice system is well documented. Green and colleagues (2005) found nearly women in the criminal justice system (98%) reported a history of trauma exposure over their lifetime, with 22% suffering from PTSD.

EAP offers a promising treatment modality for clients whose traumatic experiences can make talk therapy challenging. As prey animals, horses are particularly suited to psychotherapeutic work. They offer clients immediate, transparent and nonjudgmental feedback from a hypervigilant stance, paradoxically creating a safe holding environment. With assistance from the treatment team, clients are better able to examine their post-traumatic stress responses and rewrite internal narratives.

We recruited adult women enrolled in a trauma-informed post-release program who had participated in a local Eagala-model EAP program in the summer and fall of 2017. Interviews were conducted in private locations, were recorded and then transcribed, and lasted between 30 and 90 minutes. Participants were offered a $25 gift card for their time. At the point of this submission, we have completed three interviews with seven more scheduled.

We analyzed the data using a grounded theory approach - a process that allowed patterns and themes to emerge from the interviews. Once major themes arose, we engaged in an ongoing process of comparative analysis known as constant comparison (Padgett, 2008). We agreed on six initial themes.

Findings suggest that EAP can offer female ex-offenders the opportunity to have novel and corrective experiences in a therapeutic setting. Analyses of the data revealed six themes: 1) Feeling Safe, 2) Feeling Heard, 3) Feeling Loved, 4) Experiencing Hope, 5) Not Feeling Judged, and 6) Being Present.

One client shared her experience feeling safe as, “I don't have to put on a certain face…I can just be myself. I don't have to be afraid to tell them my story why I'm on probation...I was the real thing.” Speaking about lack of judgment, one participant remarked, “They don't look at you like, here comes a convicted felon. They don't see you like that. They see you as a human being who deserves respect...They see me as me and not for my past mistakes.”

Findings from this ongoing study provide preliminary support the claim that Eagala’s model of EAP is an effective intervention for populations who have experienced trauma. We plan to test the validity of our initial findings with the next set of interviews.

Green, B.L., Miranda, J., Daroowalla, A. & Siddique, J. (2005). Trauma exposure, mental health functioning, and program needs of women in jail. Crime & Delinquency. 51(1), 133-151.

By:
Dr. Page Buck
October 4, 2018, 4:30 pm to 5:00 pm
Hall: Hollingsworth Auditorium Track: Animal Assisted Interventions Type: 30 Minute Podium
The lived meanings of community services for homeless adults with companion animals
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The lived meanings of community services for homeless adults with companion animals

Estimates are that approximately 553,742 American adults were homeless in 2017, an increase of 1% from the previous year (U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, 2017). Of this number, 88% are over 24 years old. There are a variety of reasons for the prevalence of homelessness, which includes systemic origins such as a fluctuating labor market, lack of affordable housing, and poverty, plus intrinsic elements, mental illness, domestic violence, and substance abuse (Deck & Platt, 2015). Among programs/services provided for the homeless community are: case management, medical, mental health, soup kitchens, veteran’s services, education, financial, domestic violence, vocational, addiction treatment, and housing, many of which are offered on-site at shelters (Bah, 2015; Brown, Goodman, Guzman, Tieu, Ponath, & Kushel, 2016; Gilmer, Katz, Stefancic, & Palinkas, 2013; Petrovich & Cronley, 2015; Poremski, Woodhall-Melnik, Lemieux, & Stergiopoulos, 2015; Sinatra & Lanctot, 2016); Sundin & Baguley, 2015). Homeless individuals have “significantly greater needs than the general population” for healthcare services (Zur & Jones, 2014). Unsheltered homeless adults experience “poor health and access to care, and an increased risk for premature death” (Montgomery, Szymkowiak, & Culhane, 2017, p. 256).

Of this at-risk homeless population, approximately 25% own a companion animal (CA), which translates to over 138,436 individuals, but many from this homeless sub-group do not utilize shelters, programs or services (Rhoades, Winetrobe, & Rice, 2015). The term companion animal is synonymous with pet and defined as providing a satisfying psychological relationship that is reciprocal (Maharaj, 2015). CAs include dogs, cats, horses, reptiles, and birds among others (Arkow, 2013) but for this study, CAs are limited to dogs because of their adaptability to various environments. Because of CA restrictions inside of organizations, up to a quarter of American homeless persons may not access available programs despite the 2017 U.S. government budgeted 60.2 billion dollars toward homelessness programs (U.S. HUD, 2017). Fear of separation from a CA prevents many individuals from connecting to shelter, which leaves them vulnerable to weather, unsafe conditions, violence, and a lack of basic needs (Donley & Wright, 2012).

Adult homelessness for those with companion animals often brings unique challenges for this sub-population of vulnerable Americans. Oftentimes, homeless individuals forego basic needs provided by community services including mental health, physical health, addiction, financial, and housing services (Rock, Adams, Degeling, Massolo, & McCormack, 2014; Rhoades, Winetrobe, & Rice, 2015). Research is replete regarding components of adult attachment theory, various sub-populations, and contexts. Attachment to companion animals is discussed as a close-bond that humans have had for thousands of years (Konok, Kosztolanyl, Rainer, Mutschler, Halsband, & Miklosl, 2015). Hanrahan (2013) stated that the bond homeless individuals and other vulnerable populations have with their CA is greater than that of the domiciled population with their CA. The human-animal bond is cited to have positive physiological effects as evidenced by elevated oxytocin levels (Furst, 2015; McCullough, Ruehrdanz, & Jenkins, 2016; Serpell, et al., 2017). The purpose of this research study is to qualitatively explore the lived experiences of homeless adults with companion animals regarding their pursuit (or lack thereof) of community services. Through an Attachment Theory lens, I explore the subjective meanings from those who may have foregone basic needs to not risk separation from their animal.

By:
Sandi Harp/Social Work Instructor
October 4, 2018, 4:30 pm to 5:00 pm
Hall: Plant Biotech 156 157 Track: Animals and Poverty Type: 30 Minute Podium
Boarding and Foster Programs to Preserve the Human-Animal Bond: Lessons from Pilot Programming
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Boarding and Foster Programs to Preserve the Human-Animal Bond: Lessons from Pilot Programming

While the benefits of sharing one’s life with a companion animal are known both anecdotally and demonstrated in the literature, a pet can also complicate the life and health of its guardian. Pet ownership can become difficult due to a variety of concerns; including, accessing veterinary care, finances, or behavioral issues. These challenges may cause a family to surrender their pet. This surrender not only places a burden on the already overwhelmed animal shelter system, but also causes stress for the family as the human-animal bond is broken.
When looking at families that have minimal resources, such as those experiencing homelessness or housing instability, the concern for a breakage of the human-animal bond is magnified. Animals are not allowed to enter most human shelters, thus an animal can be a reason why an individual may not seek access to this service. Animal ownership may also pose a barrier to accessing healthcare, surgical services, or inpatient mental health services as individuals may choose to forgo these services if there is nowhere for their animal to stay.
WisCARES (Wisconsin Companion Animal Resources, Education, and Social Services) is an organization out of the University of Wisconsin Schools of Veterinary Medicine and Social Work that provides support for pet owners experiencing homelessness and housing instability. One branch of the program provides boarding and foster options so that animals may have access to a safe place to stay while their owners access shelter or healthcare. This programming is a promising point of intervention to protect the human-animal bond.
This talk will show pilot data from the WisCARES boarding and foster program from years 2014-2017; including, how many individuals have used the program, what the reasons for needing this support are, and the outcome of cases. There will also be a discussion of lessons learned from this program that can inform future interventions. This boarding and foster program has been widely used, and there is much to be learned about supporting pet owners in poverty to help keep pets with their families.

By:
Miranda Lea Braithwaite; DVM-MPH Candidate
October 4, 2018, 4:30 pm to 5:00 pm
Hall: Ellington Plant Sciences 128 Track: Animals and Poverty Type: 30 Minute Podium
4:45 pm
5:00 pm Breaks and Activities
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Breaks and Activities

Tours, Walks, Exercise, Naps

By:
VSW Team
October 4, 2018, 5:00 pm to 6:30 pm
Hall: Hollingsworth Auditorium
     
5:15 pm      
5:30 pm      
5:45 pm      
6:00 pm      
6:15 pm      
6:30 pm Off Site Networking Dinner
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Off Site Networking Dinner

Appetizer, salad, and pizza. Gluten free, vegetarian, and vegan options available. Expenses covered by VSW. Alcohol available, but not covered.

http://barleysknoxville.com/

By:
VSW Team
October 4, 2018, 6:30 pm to 9:00 pm
Hall: Hollingsworth Auditorium
     
6:45 pm      
7:00 pm      
7:15 pm      
7:30 pm      
7:45 pm      
8:00 pm      
8:15 pm      
8:30 pm      
8:45 pm      

Friday, 5th October 2018

Time Hollingsworth Auditorium Plant Biotech 156 157 Ellington Plant Sciences 125 Ellington Plant Sciences 128
8:00 am Breakfast      
8:15 am      
8:30 am Keynote: Poverty in America- An Economist’s Perspective
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Keynote: Poverty in America- An Economist’s Perspective

What do we mean by poverty? How do we measure it? How does poverty relate to inequality? How do the usual measures stack up? What federal and state programs are available to help those in or near poverty in America? How are we doing over time? This keynote will discuss these and other questions in an economic overview of poverty in America.

By:
Don Bruce, Ph.D.
October 5, 2018, 8:30 am to 9:30 am
Hall: Hollingsworth Auditorium Track: Keynote
     
8:45 am      
9:00 am      
9:15 am      
9:30 am Break Break Break Break
9:45 am
10:00 am   How Do You Extinguish Burnout? ICU Multidisciplinary Interventions to Address Staff Distress
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How Do You Extinguish Burnout? ICU Multidisciplinary Interventions to Address Staff Distress

Introduction/Background:

ICU staff at all levels deal with intensely stressful situations throughout the daily activities of patient care. In addition to the high acuity of care needed for all ICU patients, there are those patients for whom the care becomes more stressful due to religious or cultural disparity, conflicting expectations of outcomes, or need for continuous high level of care without respite. These conditions lead to fatigue, burnout, and lack of collegiality among various medical teams.
The committee brought accessible stress relief and team comradery to the ICU with the stress busters offered to day and nocturnal staff. An average of 42 staff enjoyed stress relief through various activities at each event.
Debriefing sessions were offered to all staff with an average of 11 members at each session.
In July 2016, the MD Anderson ICU Psychosocial Committee distributed an initial survey to ICU staff which included a modified Maslach scale for burnout, (emotional exhaustion, depersonalization, and personal accomplishment) which has been validated for use with health care workers. In July 2017, a second survey was distributed to the ICU staff to assess the impact of the burnout prevention/wellbeing interventions provided over the course of the year. The impact of Hurricane Harvey on Houston and MD Anderson staff interfered with collection of post-surveys but enough were completed before the storm to draw preliminary conclusions about the efficacy of the interventions.

Interventions:
Low-Cost Stress Busters
ICU staff have little time for de-stressing interventions during the work day and oftentimes budgets for such activities can be minimal. We will suggest creative ways to provide fun activities that allow for a short mental break from the rigors of ICU care by highlighting our ongoing stress buster activities and reviewing the staff response to these brief but effective stress busters.

Debriefing Sessions
The psychosocial aspects of caring for a critically ill patient and their family care can take an emotional toll on the ICU team. At times these psychosocial aspects can be more challenging than merely management of medical needs. A structured debriefing session during an ICU admission or post discharge provides a medium where staff members are able to reflect on the stressors/difficulties that arise when working with challenging cases as well as honor the care provided. Debriefing sessions not only assist with burnout but also renew staff members’ commitment to their profession and to the care they provide to ICU patients. We will provide information on how social workers can conduct debriefing sessions with multidisciplinary staff members and review feedback gained from these debriefing sessions.


References:

Caine RM, Ter-Bagdasarian L. Early identification and management of critical incident stress. Crit Care Nurse. 2003 Feb;23(1):59-65. Review. PubMed PMID: 12640960.

Coomber S, Todd C, Park G, Baxter P, Firth-Cozens J, Shore S. Stress in UK intensive care unit doctors. Br J Anaesth. 2002 Dec;89(6):873-81. PubMed PMID: 12453932.

Donchin Y, Seagull FJ. The hostile environment of the intensive care unit. Curr Opin Crit Care. 2002 Aug;8(4):316-20. Review. PubMed PMID: 12386492.

Keene EA, Hutton N, Hall B, Rushton C. Bereavement debriefing sessions: an intervention to support health care professionals in managing their grief after the death of a patient. Pediatr Nurs. 2010 Jul-Aug;36(4):185-9; quiz 190. PubMed PMID: 20860257.

Kerasiotis B, Motta RW. Assessment of PTSD symptoms in emergency room, intensive care unit, and general floor nurses. Int J Emerg Ment Health. 2004 Summer;6(3):121-33. PubMed PMID: 15481474.

Cited in PMCRelated citations

Moss M, Good VS, Gozal D, Kleinpell R, Sessler CN. An Official Critical Care Societies Collaborative Statement: Burnout Syndrome in Critical Care Healthcare Professionals: A Call for Action. Crit Care Med. 2016 Jul;44(7):1414-21. doi: 10.1097/CCM.0000000000001885. PubMed PMID: 27309157.

Myhren H, Ekeberg O, Stokland O. Job Satisfaction and Burnout among Intensive Care Unit Nurses and Physicians. Crit Care Res Pract. 2013;2013:786176. doi: 10.1155/2013/786176. Epub 2013 Nov 5. PubMed PMID: 24303211; PubMed Central PMCID: PMC3835606.

Padilla Fortunatti C, Palmeiro-Silva YK. Effort-Reward Imbalance and Burnout Among ICU Nursing Staff: A Cross-Sectional Study. Nurs Res. 2017 Sep/Oct;66(5):410-416. doi: 10.1097/NNR.0000000000000239. PubMed PMID: 28858150.

Poncet MC, Toullic P, Papazian L, Kentish-Barnes N, Timsit JF, Pochard F, Chevret S, Schlemmer B, Azoulay E. Burnout syndrome in critical care nursing staff. Am J Respir Crit Care Med. 2007 Apr 1;175(7):698-704. Epub 2006 Nov 16. PubMed PMID: 17110646.

By:
Laura Walther-Broussard, LCSW, OSW-C Sr. Social Work Counselor
October 5, 2018, 10:00 am to 10:30 am
Hall: Plant Biotech 156 157 Track: Compassion Fatigue and Conflict Management Type: 30 Minute Podium
Modeling Accessible Care Programs
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Modeling Accessible Care Programs

Understanding the types of veterinary care delivered to underserved communities might help social workers better understand how to help veterinary clients affected by poverty. This project developed an accessible veterinary care program index and surveyed programs providing accessible care about their operational structure and output. 440 individual programs were surveyed and 20 programs were studied more in depth. Six models which recur throughout the United States were identified based on operational structure and client base: spay/neuter clinics, wellness clinics, limited service clinics, free service clinics, full service veterinary clinics with limited accessible services, and full service veterinary clinics.
Results indicate that veterinary services are being provided to underserved communities and populations at risk through differing mediums. Clients throughout the United States are receiving veterinary care at reduced rates through both private practice veterinarians and non-profit organizations. One model is not obviously more successful over others in providing services and remaining economically viable. There are multiple suggestions that providing veterinary services to in need populations could be economically beneficial to veterinarians although more research is necessary to understand the best model for practitioners.

By:
Emily McCobb DVM MS DACVAA
October 5, 2018, 10:00 am to 10:30 am
Hall: Ellington Plant Sciences 125 Track: Animals and Poverty Type: 30 Minute Podium
10:15 am  
10:30 am   The experience of Pet Bereavement: A Phenomenological Study
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The experience of Pet Bereavement: A Phenomenological Study

On average, 80 million American households (or 34.8%) own one or more pet (American Veterinary Medical Association as cited in Cordaro, 2012, p.283). Out of these 80 million American households, one in four dogs will develop neoplasia (uncontrolled, abnormal tissue or cell growth) or a tumor, and more than 50% of dogs over the age of ten will develop cancer (https://www.avma.org/public/PetCare/Pages/Cancer-in-Pets.aspx). Despite the significant role pets play in their owner’s lives, the loss of a pet is inconsistently recognized as an authentic occasion for bereavement (Clements, Benasutti, & Carmone, 2003).
Available research on pet bereavement ranges from the exploration of pet and owner attachment levels, which has been found within college students to be equivalent to their emotional bonds with their family, friends and significant others (Kurdek, 2008 as cited in Cordaro, 2012, p. 283); comparative studies examining differences in the child and adult grief reaction, focusing on pet bereavement; and pet loss via euthanasia. Despite the wide range of available literature, there is little focus on the overall experience of pet bereavement. As a result of this gap in the literature, the current study addresses the need for more research to understand the experience of losing a pet and how pet owners grieve.
This study utilizes qualitative data from ten interviews with people who experienced loss of their beloved pet (N=10). Hermeneutic phenomenology was selected as a method of analysis to gain understanding of the essential meaning of lived experiences from participants' perspective and descriptions. Phenomenology is based on a shared experience and meaning making (Creswell, 2013), therefore it is well suited to this inquiry by allowing the voices of pet owners to describe their experiences in their own words.
The findings of this study will be shared in this presentation. Data analysis is underway and will be completed by May 2018. The findings of the study will fill a gap in research that will identify and increase resources for those grieving the loss of their pet, and to inform social service providers how to better assist pet owners through the bereavement process.

By:
Paula Gerstenblatt, PhD, Assistant Professor of Social Work
October 5, 2018, 10:30 am to 11:00 am
Hall: Plant Biotech 156 157 Track: Grief and Bereavement Type: 30 Minute Podium
Assessment of a low-cost community medicine program: Demographics, barriers to care, and dog health outcomes
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Assessment of a low-cost community medicine program: Demographics, barriers to care, and dog health outcomes

Evaluating the effectiveness of community veterinary healthcare models is a key aspect of creating infrastructure for reducing veterinary healthcare inequalities, and scaling up such initiatives to impact a wider range of communities, particularly with regard to racial/ethnic diversity. These initiatives have the potential to affect canine health on a community-level, as well as provide sustainability through utilizing a teaching model that educates the next generation of veterinary professionals in the specific needs of underserved animal populations. The objective of this study was to assess the impact of a community based veterinary medical program (the Tufts at Tech Community Veterinary Clinic) on indicators of canine health and well-being in an underserved community through the provision of low-cost preventative care. Participants were 177 low-income dog owners; 63 were repeat wellness/preventative care clients of the Tufts at Tech clinic, 46 were new or urgent care clients of the Tufts at Tech clinic, and 68 were a comparison sample of owners who had not used the clinic but did attend an outreach clinic in a community setting. Participants were asked to complete a survey that assessed owner demographic information, indicators of canine health and quality of life, pet attachment, and barriers that limit access to veterinary care.
Results indicated that clients of the Tufts at Tech clinic were more likely to be White/Caucasian and female. In addition, there were significant positive differences on several indicators of canine health and preventative care for the Tufts at Tech wellness clients including monthly heartworm use (p

By:
Megan Mueller, PhD; assistant professor of human-animal interaction
October 5, 2018, 10:30 am to 11:00 am
Hall: Ellington Plant Sciences 125 Track: Animals and Poverty Type: 30 Minute Podium
Animals, Poverty, and the Law: How Laws Impact People and Pets Living in Poverty
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Animals, Poverty, and the Law: How Laws Impact People and Pets Living in Poverty

Especially in recent years, much attention has been devoted to the growth of animal protection law, with a number of states and localities implementing or revising statutes and ordinances to match evolving moral and ethical attitudes toward animals. Often, these laws provide for basic care standards to help ensure the humane treatment of companion animals in a variety of settings. Examples include, but are not limited to: laws governing the treatment of companion animals in commercial settings, general anti-cruelty and neglect laws applying to the treatment of animals in public and private spaces and laws establishing care standards and accountability in shelters. The result of such legislation often means improved welfare outcomes for animals as well as greater public awareness of the value and importance of animal welfare.

Increasingly, cross-disciplinary collaboration between the animal welfare and social services sector is resulting in a better understanding of the intersection between human and animal well-being. This understanding, in turn, creates an opportunity to develop creative legislative and policy solutions to common problems facing animals and people in society. Current examples include protective orders for pets in domestic violence cases and funding toward programs especially directed toward low-income people with pets. On the other hand, sometimes well-intended laws lead to discriminatory results for people in poverty, and ultimately end in worse outcomes for animals also. This podium presentation will focus on some of the potential impacts of these laws on populations in poverty, with an emphasis on mandatory spay/neuter laws, restrictive ownership laws and policies and shelter impoundment laws. Using real-life scenarios, this presentation will outline alternative approaches that effectively protect animals and communities, while protecting the needs and rights of vulnerable populations in poverty.

By:
Akisha Townsend Eaton, Legislative Attorney
October 5, 2018, 10:30 am to 11:00 am
Hall: Ellington Plant Sciences 128 Track: Animals and Poverty Type: 30 Minute Podium
10:45 am  
11:00 am Break Break Break Break
11:15 am
11:30 am   Pet ownership among street-involved youth: A strengths-based approach
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Pet ownership among street-involved youth: A strengths-based approach

Up to 23% of street-involved youth are pet owners (1), for whom animals are often their only source of unconditional love without judgement (2). Pet ownership confers both barriers and benefits. Pets limit youth from accessing shelter and services (1,2), but also may mitigate loneliness and depression (1,3), and motivate youth to make healthier choices (2). To date implementation of human-animal interactions in social work practice is limited (4,5). Not only are animal companions a potential gateway to engage youth and establish trust but are opportunities for youth to develop strengths through pet ownership (2). For social workers to successfully leverage pet ownership in a strengths-based approach, workers and agencies must be reflective of their own attitudes, biases and beliefs on animal companionship, and adopt an open and supportive alliance with youth and their pets. In practice, this involves asking youth about pet ownership, acknowledging and understanding the significance of the human-animal bond, addressing the needs & concerns of youth with pets, increasing the accessibility of pet-friendly services, awareness of animal-assisted interventions, and pet supports in the form of creating ways for youth to access services (e.g. pet rooms), advocating and resourcing for veterinary and other pet-related support (e.g. temporary boarding) offering, and pet food and supplies banks. As social work practice seeks to understand the “person-in-environment” within the context of larger social structures, animal companions must be considered part of youths’ social support and social location.

References
1. Rhoades, H., Winetrobe, H., & Rice, E. (2014). Pet ownership among homeless youth: Associations with mental health, service utilization and housing status. Child Psychiatry & Human Development. doi:10.1007/s10578-014-0463-5
2. Lem, M., Coe, J., Haley, D., Stone, E. and O’Grady, W. (2013) Effects of companion animal ownership among Canadian street-involved youth: A Qualitative Analysis. Journal of Sociology & Social Welfare, XL(4):285-304.
3. Lem, M., Coe, J., Haley, D., Stone, E. and O’Grady, W. (2016). The protective association between pet ownership and depression among street-involved youth: A cross-sectional study. Anthrozoös, 29(1):123-136.
4. Risley-Curtiss, C. (2010). Social work practitioners and the human-companion animal bond: A national study. Social Work, 55(1), 38-46.
5. Hanrahan, C. (2013). Social work and human animal bonds and benefits in health research: A provincial study. Critical Social Work, 14(1), 63-79.References
1. Rhoades, H., Winetrobe, H., & Rice, E. (2014). Pet ownership among homeless youth: Associations with mental health, service utilization and housing status. Child Psychiatry & Human Development. doi:10.1007/s10578-014-0463-5
2. Lem, M., Coe, J., Haley, D., Stone, E. and O’Grady, W. (2013) Effects of companion animal ownership among Canadian street-involved youth: A Qualitative Analysis. Journal of Sociology & Social Welfare, XL(4):285-304.
3. Lem, M., Coe, J., Haley, D., Stone, E. and O’Grady, W. (2016). The protective association between pet ownership and depression among street-involved youth: A cross-sectional study. Anthrozoös, 29(1):123-136.
4. Risley-Curtiss, C. (2010). Social work practitioners and the human-companion animal bond: A national study. Social Work, 55(1), 38-46.
5. Hanrahan, C. (2013). Social work and human animal bonds and benefits in health research: A provincial study. Critical Social Work, 14(1), 63-79.

By:
Michelle Lem DVM, MSc, MSW, RSW
October 5, 2018, 11:30 am to 12:00 pm
Hall: Plant Biotech 156 157 Track: Animals and Poverty Type: 30 Minute Podium
Foster care program aimed at keeping vulnerable and at-risk human population with their animal companions.
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Foster care program aimed at keeping vulnerable and at-risk human population with their animal companions.

People experiencing homelessness and those who are at risk of experiencing homelessness many times have a connection with a pet dog or cat. This pet provides them with companionship, emotional and mental support, and sometimes protection. For many of these people, the pet even provides an incentive for them to get back on their feet and into a situation that is better for both them and their pet. However, the pet inevitably sometimes also is a hindrance and acts as a barrier for the person to get the help or services they need to attain housing or medical care. For instance, many people will not go into medical care and treatment for fear of losing their pet, many will not seek shelter in the winter for fear of leaving their pet outside alone, and many will not seek temporary housing to become permanently housed as many temporary facilities do not allow pets.

We have created an organization that works to alleviate these barriers by providing a foster program for these pets. This gives their owners the time they need to obtain the medical care and/or resources they need to get better, with an end goal of becoming housed and in a more stable living environment. Person and pet are then reunited, and the pet is ideally house trained from going through the foster program. We also provide veterinary care for the pet while in the foster program, and continue follow up with them once they are reunited and help them when and where needed. We require the pets’ owners to check in with us regularly and we make sure they are getting the treatment or care they need and take reasonable steps and make goals to get to be in a sustainable place in their lives.

Doing this work for the past three to four years in our community we have worked with the chronically and temporary homeless, those fleeing domestic abuse and violence, veterans, those in a bind due to medical bills or the need for medical care of their own, those with mental illness, and even convicted felons. We have prevented many pets from being added to the burden of the local animal shelters and thus prevented pets from being unnecessarily euthanized. We have also seen our clients have less recidivism than those without pets, due to their dedication to their pets and the support system they provide. We have researched and have not found this process being done anywhere else and feel there is a need for it to be replicated in other cities.

By:
Leslie Sadeghi Brooks, DVM
October 5, 2018, 11:30 am to 12:00 pm
Hall: Ellington Plant Sciences 125 Track: Animals and Poverty Type: 30 Minute Podium
 
11:45 am    
12:00 pm Beyond the Cliché’—Pets Really ARE Family Members (talk occurs during lunch)
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Beyond the Cliché’—Pets Really ARE Family Members (talk occurs during lunch)

There is little question that companion animals enrich our lives in countless ways. As relationships between pets and their human guardians have evolved, pets are even more central to the human experience. Yet, in some ways the keeping of pets has become so costly that only those with means (or good credit) are able to afford to keep their best friends. At the same time, the animal welfare movement has evolved dramatically. Many shelters find themselves in a position of having too few animals for adoption to meet public demand. Their focus is shifting outward to supporting families and preserving the human-animal bond. Hear from a career leader in animal welfare how access to care impacts ALL members of the family.

By:
Jim Tedford, CAWA
October 5, 2018, 12:00 pm to 1:30 pm
Hall: Hollingsworth Auditorium Track: Keynote
     
12:15 pm      
12:30 pm      
12:45 pm      
1:00 pm      
1:15 pm      
1:30 pm   Hard choices: Delivering compassionate community-focused medicine
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Hard choices: Delivering compassionate community-focused medicine

Veterinarians and other medical professionals receive little training on communication and customer service. This gap is accentuated when difficult conversations with clients are required. In underserved communities where access and resources are limited and decisions must be made based on practical considerations, these conversations become more nuanced. In this workshop customer service and medical experts from the ASPCA will discuss techniques for approaching these conversations and ways to assist clients in making difficult decisions about their pets’ health.

By:
Carolyn R. Brown, DVM and Jocelyn Kessler
October 5, 2018, 1:30 pm to 2:30 pm
Hall: Plant Biotech 156 157 Track: Grief and Bereavement Type: 60 minute
 
1:45 pm    
2:00 pm    
2:15 pm    
2:30 pm   Break Break Break
2:45 pm  
3:00 pm   Models for Animal Accommodations in Homeless Services
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Models for Animal Accommodations in Homeless Services

Existing literature reveals that people experiencing homelessness with companion animals have restricted ability to access shelter and housing services (Cronley, Strand, Patterson & Gwaitney, 2009; Kidd & Kidd, 1994; Singer, Hart, & Zasloff, 1995; Slatter, Lloyd, & King, 2012). In the event that people experiencing homelessness are presented with the ultimatum of seeking shelter/housing or staying with their animal, many will choose to remain on the streets with their pets. What the research does not address is how to build policies and programs to accommodate animals in homeless services successfully.

Despite limited best practices in the macro and mezzo spheres of addressing homelessness and animal companionship, community groups have managed to develop programs to bridge the gap in services. The presentation will review how various organizations from across the United States meet the challenge of increasing access to shelter for people experiencing homelessness with companion animals. Methods range from creating a foster care network, kenneling animals at affiliated partners’ facilities, and advocating for on-site co-sheltering at homeless shelters. Methods for increasing housing and shelter options for homeless human-animal families must be recognized in order to build the evidence base and best practices. In conclusion, the presentation will shed new light on emerging practices currently being utilized to encourage greater attention and research in the area of sheltering people experiencing homelessness and their companion animals.

By:
Emma Newton, William Gilles, DVM, Janet Hoy
October 5, 2018, 3:00 pm to 4:00 pm
Hall: Plant Biotech 156 157 Track: Animals and Poverty Type: 60 minute
The Next Generation of Companion Animal Welfare - Reaching People and Pets in Underserved Areas
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The Next Generation of Companion Animal Welfare - Reaching People and Pets in Underserved Areas


Most people are aware of how poverty and structural inequality create challenges and barriers when it comes to accessing healthy food, education, jobs, health care and housing. But there is less awareness of how limited affordable veterinary and pet wellness services create similar obstacles and therefore disadvantages millions of people and pets in the United States. There are 78 million dogs and 86 million cats in 80 million American households, and pet ownership crosses all geographic, racial and socio-economic boundaries. But while love of pets is a consistent value, scarce access to information, advice and direct care services produce hardships and heartache for many pet owners in underserved communities, making the denial of resources and support a social justice issue in its own right.

Lack of access to resources is too frequently equated to people having a lack of care and concern for their pets. Instead of working to understand the systemic challenges created by poverty and finding solutions to remove barriers to information and services, many in animal welfare address the effects of poverty as a people problem coercing families to relinquish their pets or handing out citations and punishment. These strategies are often based on a belief that people living in poverty shouldn’t have pets.

With an estimated 23 million pets living in U.S. families whose income level is below the poverty line-four times the number of dogs and cats who enter animal shelters each year-and millions more in working poor and middle class families struggling with the cost of care for their pets, availability of resources for companion animals is an overlooked national crisis. It’s time to acknowledge this crisis by bridging the gap in access to resources and honoring the human-animal bond that is universal regardless of income or zip code.

The workshop will include the sharing of data collected from over 130,000 pets in underserved communities across the country through the Pets for Life program and a recent published study conducted by the University of Denver's Graduate School of Social Work on the role race and ethnicity play in accessing veterinary care.

By:
Aimee Christian, Amanda Arrington, Director Pets for Life, Lori Hensley
October 5, 2018, 3:00 pm to 4:00 pm
Hall: Ellington Plant Sciences 128 Track: Animals and Poverty Type: 60 minute
3:15 pm  
3:30 pm  
3:45 pm  
4:00 pm Break Break Break Break
4:15 pm   Unsheltered Bonds: Homeless Animal Guardianship
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Unsheltered Bonds: Homeless Animal Guardianship

A landmark study of homeless animal guardians showed that both chronically and acutely homeless individuals had been denied housing due to an accompanying companion animal (Singer, Hart, & Zasloff, 1995). Both groups also stated that they had or would decline housing offered to them on the principle that they would never choose to live in a place without their animal. Results from the study suggest that homeless animal guardians' high attachment to their animals, refusal to separate from their animals, and lack of pet-friendly housing and shelter options collude to contribute to continuing homelessness (Singer, Hart, & Zasloff, 1995).

In this cross-sectional, qualitative study we sought to test Singer and colleagues' (1995) hypothesis that homeless individuals who are animal guardians would be strongly attached to their pets. Further, we sought to test the hypothesis that this bond would have had an impact on housing and service opportunities. In winter and fall 2017, we received IRB approval to recruit research participants from service fairs held in Philadelphia, PA and Toledo, OH by a national nonprofit organization whose mission is to increase access to shelter and housing programs for homeless people with companion animals. The fair offered a variety of free services including access to veterinary care, grooming, and training services. Also available was pet food and other pet supplies.

On the day of the fair, we initiated recruitment once participants had received all of their preferred services. Our efforts in Philadelphia netted interviews with three individuals. In Toledo, OH, interviews were conducted with five individuals. We collected background information including the duration and frequency of homelessness and access to services. We explored participants' experiences with shelter and service denial, preferences for shelter, and resource needs. We also invited participants to complete the standardized Lexington Attachment to Pets Scale (Johnson, Garrity, & Stallones, 1991).

Findings support the claim that homeless animal guardians are strongly attached to their pets. On a scale of 0-69, the mean score for the eight participants was 66.9 Unanimously, participants indicated that they have experienced hardship due to their animal guardianship. Hardships ranged from denial of access to temporary and permanent housing, denial of social services, denial of community services, and theft of animal. One participant explained that his dogs were stolen while he was sleeping on the street. He hypothesized that people often believe they are "rescuing" dogs when they are, in fact, taking a member of someone's family.

Johnson, T. P., Garrity, T. F., & Stallones, L. (1992). Psychometric evaluation of the Lexington attachment to pets scale (LAPS). Anthrozoös, 5(3), 160-175.

Singer, R. S., Hart, L. A., & Zasloff, R. L. (1995). Dilemmas associated with rehousing homeless people who have companion animals. Psychological reports, 77(3), 851-857.

By:
Dr. Page Buck, LSW
October 5, 2018, 4:15 pm to 5:00 pm
Hall: Plant Biotech 156 157 Track: Animals and Poverty Type: 45 Minute
Promising Practice Interventions for Social Workers Addressing Pet Owners and Poverty
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Promising Practice Interventions for Social Workers Addressing Pet Owners and Poverty

In recent years, the animal welfare community has begun to explore innovative ways to reduce animals being surrendered to municipal animal shelters and strengthen pet ownership. National animal protection agencies and community shelters around the country have instituted large-scale spay/neuter interventions in under-served communities and introduced surrender prevention programs. At the same time, some human service programs have successfully begun to address the needs of vulnerable pet owners but efforts have been much slower nationwide. Much of this work has focused on the link between human welfare and animal violence and attention has been given to domestic violence shelters offering safety to pets and people together.

While the number of co-shelters for people and pets affected by domestic violence have increased nationally in the last five years, this 90 minute workshop will address the importance of social services to recognize and respond to the larger needs of pet owners facing poverty and devastating circumstances.

The workshop will include the following:
1) A brief poverty simulation showcasing the affect of poverty and circumstance for pet owners who lack assistance when human service programs fail to consider pet ownership issues
2) A review of promising practice efforts around the country including Crisis Foster programs, Engagement programs, and Surrender and Surrender Prevention Programs (programs will include efforts in Des Moines Iowa, New York City, and other locations)
3) Practical interventions for social workers to respond to animal welfare issues
4) Challenges to adapting programs to respond to animal welfare issues and efforts to overcome these challenges
5) Questions, Answers and Next Steps

By:
Jennifer Coffey, Director of Community Outreach, Kim Wolf
October 5, 2018, 4:15 pm to 5:00 pm
Hall: Ellington Plant Sciences 125 Track: Animals and Poverty Type: 45 Minute
Supporting the Senior-Animal Bond across a Continuum of Continuing Care: The Role of Veterinary Social Work
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Supporting the Senior-Animal Bond across a Continuum of Continuing Care: The Role of Veterinary Social Work

In the proposed presentation, we focus on the continuum of continuing care for older adults (e.g., Dyeson, 2004) with specific attention to the role of companion animals as an important part of seniors’ health and well-being along the continuum. Using examples from the work of ElderDog Canada, we highlight both the need to consider the human-animal bond in the provision of continuing care and identify a role for veterinary social work in the support of seniors and their companion animals.

The continuum of care for seniors typically spans preventative care to support healthy independent living to end-of-life support. Provision of services at points in between address an often gradual move from independent to dependent living. As Dyeson (2004) points out, social workers can be found at nearly every point along the continuum interfacing with other professionals and services as needed. Veterinary social workers, we argue, have an equally important and similar role to play to support seniors with their companion animals.

According to Suthers-McCabe (2001, p. 93), “The human-animal bond is perhaps stronger and more profound in later life than at any other age.” Similarly, Hart (2006, p. 90) asserts, “Old age is the period when people are most strongly and deeply attached to their animals.” Huss (2014) describes companion animals as a vital part of many seniors’ daily existence. A majority of elderly dog owners report their dogs as their only friend and their relationship as strong as with humans (Chur-Hansen, et al., 2009). It also is documented that people avoid medical attention because they fear admission to hospital or residential care, which would mean having to give up their pet or for fear that their pet would be put down (Boat & Knight, 2000; Raina et al, 1999). Ormerod (2012) observed that those who are instructed to give up their pets before moving into sheltered accommodation are among the most distraught who attend veterinary practice.

The work of ElderDog includes providing seniors in-home assistance with basic dog care, finding new homes for beloved dogs who lose their human due to illness, death, or relocation, and helping seniors find a mature canine companion to “grow old with.” As a senior serving organization, ElderDog works in a variety of ways across the continuum of continuing care to support the human-animal bond particularly for those with limited means to access supports that lie outside those available through publicly funded agencies.

The complexity of issues related to preserving the senior-animal bond, revealed in the presentation, will contribute to a conversation about the need for cross-sectoral strategies to include the human-animal bond within the context of veterinary social work practice involving seniors and their companion animals.

References
Boat, B. W., & Knight, J. C. (2000). Experiences and needs of adult protective services case managers when assisting clients who have companion animals. Journal of ElderAbuse and Neglect, 12(3 & 4), 125-136.
Chur-Hansen, A., Winefield, H. R., & Beckwith, M. (2009). Companion animals for elderly women; The importance of attachment. Qualitative research in psychology, 6(4), 281-293.
Dyeson, T. B. (2004). The home health care social worker: A conduit in the care continuum for older adults. Home Health Care Management & Practice, 16(4), 290-292.
Hart, L. A. (2006). Community context and psychosocial benefits of animal companionship. In A. H. Fine (Ed.) Handbook of animal-assisted therapy: Theoretical foundations and guidelines for practice. San Diego, CA: Academic Press (pp. 73-94).
Huss, R. J. (2014). "Re-evaluating the role of companion animals in the era of the aging boomer," Akron Law Review, 47(2), Article 5. Retrieved: http://ideaexchange.uakron.edu/akronlawreview/vol47/iss2/5
Ormerod (2012)
Suthers-McCabe, H. (2001). Take one pet and call me in the morning. Generations, 25(2), 93-95.
Raina, P., Waltner-Toews, D. Bonnett, B., Woodward, C., & Abernathy, T. (1999). Influence of companion animals on the physical and psychological health of older people: An analysis of a one-year longitudinal study. Journal of the American Geriatric Society, 47(3), 323-329

By:
Dr. Ardra Cole, Sarah Bernardi RSW, MSW
October 5, 2018, 4:15 pm to 5:00 pm
Hall: Ellington Plant Sciences 128 Track: Animal Assisted Interventions Type: 45 Minute
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Saturday, 6th October 2018

Time Hollingsworth Auditorium Plant Biotech 156 157 Ellington Plant Sciences 125 Ellington Plant Sciences 128
8:00 am Veterinary Social Work Oath and Breakfast
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Veterinary Social Work Oath and Breakfast

By:
VSW Team
October 6, 2018, 8:00 am to 9:45 am
Hall: Hollingsworth Auditorium
     
8:15 am      
8:30 am      
8:45 am      
9:00 am      
9:15 am      
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9:45 am Integration Activity
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Integration Activity

By:
VSW Team
October 6, 2018, 9:45 am to 10:30 am
Hall: Hollingsworth Auditorium
     
10:00 am      
10:15 am      
10:30 am Break      
10:45 am      
11:00 am Strengthening the Social Safety Net
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Strengthening the Social Safety Net

Lack of access to veterinary care is a complex societal problem with multiple causes but primarily associated with low socio-economic status. Millions of pets do not receive adequate veterinary care because the costs are beyond the family’s ability to pay. Through evidence-based decisions, with a family-centric approach, underserved families will gain access to veterinary care. Aligncare™ is a model of One Health veterinary care involving social service, public health, and veterinary medicine professionals working collaboratively with communities to strengthen the social safety net, keeping families together.

By:
Dr. Michael Blackwell
October 6, 2018, 11:00 am to 12:00 pm
Hall: Hollingsworth Auditorium Track: Keynote
     
11:15 am      
11:30 am      
11:45 am      
12:00 pm Lunch      
12:15 pm      
12:30 pm      
12:45 pm      
1:00 pm Race and Cultural Diversity in VSW
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Race and Cultural Diversity in VSW

Among the health professions, the mission and focus of social work is specifically focused on working with marginalized and oppressed individuals, families, groups, organizations, and communities. Direct social work practice involves a range of different skills, behaviours, and attitudes used to address a multitude of personal and structural issues across the life cycle. In North America poverty continues to be the singular most pressing social issue. Although poverty can affect anyone across differences certain people are more likely to experience poverty than others. In 2010, according to Human Resources and Skills development Canada (2012), the groups experiencing the highest rates of poverty in Canada were single adults 45-65 (1 in 3 lived in poverty); people with disabilities (more than 1 in 5); lone parent families (1 in 5, the majority of which were headed by females); immigrants who arrived in Canada after 2000 (1 in 6); and Indigenous people living off reserve (1 in 6). Within these groups certain risks factors like age, geographical area, gender and being a member of a visible minority make some social groups more susceptible to poverty than others. While some governments such as the federal government in Canada recognize poverty reduction as a key priority and maintain statutory programs and services that make up this country’s social safety net, including Old Age Security; Canada Pension Plan; Employment Insurance; and National Child Benefit, other governments in similarly developed countries do not. The inadequacy or absence of social service and income security programs in such countries has not deterred people from keeping companions-animals and caring for them as family members (Serpell, 1996). For individuals and families who share their lives and homes with non-human animals and for whom the human-animal bond provide significant social support and emotional/psychological security and comfort, few if any social welfare services extend support to non-human animal significant others and companions. As an innovative social work subspecialty, Veterinary Social Work is unique because, in recognizing human animal relationships as important in the lives of human clients, and the complex socio-political dynamics and emotions that inform and are informed by those who perform veterinary work, VSW expands the scope of practice in response to the diverse realities and needs of individuals, families, and communities (Hanrahan, Sabo, & Robb, 2017). The typical fee-for-service clinical setting for VSW, however, may be a barrier for low-income people, and unquestionably for those living in poverty, resulting in a racialized bias/dynamic typifying the practice. More discreet forms of racism, in contrast to “in-your-face” slavery and segregation, include a lack of access to resources, higher rates of unemployment, and thus poverty. This working group will explore issues of race and cultural diversity in VSW, within the larger historical context of race politics within North America. Draft Meeting Outline: Roundtable introductions/ review and approval of working agenda/ Problem description by abstract submitter/Participant input to problem formulation/Discussion of possible goals and objectives to consider, such as alternative VSW models and funding, VSW outreach into communities of colour with community partners, and conducting a literature review.

References
Hanrahan, C., Sabo, B. M., & Robb, P. (2017, September 28). Secondary Traumatic Stress and Veterinarians: Human–Animal Bonds as Psychosocial Determinants of Health. Traumatology. Advance online publication. http://dx.doi.org/10.1037/trm0000135

Human Resources and Skills development Canada (2012), 2012 – 2013 Estimates Report on Plans and Priorities. Retrieved from http://www.tbs-sct.gc.ca/rpp/2012-2013/inst/csd/csd-eng.pdf. March 1, 2018

Serpell, J. (1996). In the company of animals: A study of animal-human relationships (2nd ed., rev.). New York, NY: Cambridge University Press.

By:
Cassandra Hanrahan, Assistant Professor
October 6, 2018, 1:00 pm to 4:45 pm
Hall: Hollingsworth Auditorium Track: Working Group
Veterinarians Working with Accessible Care: Working Group on Recommended Training Beyond the Clinical
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Veterinarians Working with Accessible Care: Working Group on Recommended Training Beyond the Clinical

As a growing interest is placed on the question of accessible veterinary care, and a growing number of practitioners in the veterinary medical field are looking to be involved in outreach of some capacity, there is a need for further education for veterinary professionals on how to successfully engage with communities in poverty. While the increased interest has the potential to improve the health and wellbeing of a huge population of pets in the United States, there is also the potential to do real damage if veterinarians and support staff approach such outreach from the wrong framework. There is also little support or information that is easy to find for practitioners who may be interested in furthering this sort of skill set. Developing wise practices and recommendations for education for the veterinary medical practitioner should be a priority as this area of the veterinary medical field grows. We feel the veterinary social work summit is the perfect place to have an interdisciplinary conversation about how to move this forward.

1. Define and articulate for the veterinary medical practitioner the particular challenges and potential damage (to the community) of working with underserved populations for the veterinary medical practitioner.
2. Develop a list of recommendations for veterinary practitioners for further training that would aid and benefit community outreach with underserved populations (Such as trauma-informed care, mental health first aid training, etc.)
3. Determine a framework for providing information and resources for veterinary practitioners to access training and support around these themes.
4. Connect invested parties for the purpose of future development and growth of such recommendations and resources.


Working Group Draft Agenda:
15 minutes: Introductions, personal histories, and ground rules for discussion.
60 minutes. Circle share of experiences and, in particular, challenges that participants have faced working with clients in poverty.
Develop a list of themes that continually resurface.
60 minutes. Develop a list of potential themes, values from the social work profession, or experiences individuals have had that have been positive and productive for practitioner development (such as QPR, harm reduction, trauma informed care, etc.)
45: Determine the major priorities within these themes and challenges (Which ones are connected? Which ones are resolvable?)
List out concrete resources that exist, where they are to be accessed.
60 minutes: Finalize recommendation for moving forward - what are the next steps? Whose responsibility is it to build out these steps? What could we put out tomorrow that would give veterinarians and support staff a guideline for further education to support community outreach?

By:
William Gilles, DVM, Levi Sable
October 6, 2018, 1:00 pm to 4:45 pm
Hall: Plant Biotech 156 157 Track: Working Group
Association of Veterinary Social Work
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Association of Veterinary Social Work

This group aims to brainstorm activities to aid in the development of the Association of Veterinary Social Work. The discussion will be facilitated by Dr. Elizabeth Strand. Dr. Elizabeth Strand is the Founding Director of Veterinary Social Work (VSW) and the “All Creatures Great and Small” Endowed Clinical Associate Professor at the University of Tennessee Colleges of Social Work and Veterinary Medicine. She is a licensed clinical social worker, experienced family therapist, Grief Recovery Specialist, and a Mindfulness-Based Stress Reduction Teacher. Her professional mission is to encourage the humane treatment of both people and animals and to care for those professionals who care for animals.

By:
Many
October 6, 2018, 1:00 pm to 4:45 pm
Hall: Ellington Plant Sciences 125 Track: Working Group
 
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6:30 pm        
6:45 pm        
7:00 pm        
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Legend

 Compassion Fatigue and Conflict Management Working Group Grief and Bereavement The link between human and animal violence
 Animal Assisted Interventions Animals and Poverty Registration Welcome and get to know you
 Keynote